1000 Frames per Second, 200 TB per Launch

MAM System within NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

Curator integrates alongside Quantum StorNext Pro and Telestream Vantage to create elegant image capture and distribution workflow.

80 to 100 cameras capture the event from every possible angle, and they keep tracking the rocket and its payload until it passes out of range at a height of about 8,000 feet. (Source: IPV Ltd.)

UK-based media asset management and technology specialist, IPV, has announced the successful integration of its Curator Content Factory Media Asset Management (MAM) system within NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The MAM system is being used within a fully digital solution for launch video capture and delivery systems at the Kennedy Space Center and integrates seamlessly alongside a Quantum StorNext 5 storage system and Telestream Vantage content transcoding.

There are not very many imaging environments more challenging, or more critical, than the one that supports launches at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. During any liftoff, 80 to 100 cameras capture the event from every possible angle, and they keep tracking the rocket and its payload until it passes out of range at a height of about 8,000 feet. The data, which include images and video taken with high-resolution cameras at speeds of up 1000 frames per second, weigh in today at around 200 TB per launch, and they must be made available to scientists and flight specialists in several different NASA centers as quickly as possible.

When NASA wrote the requirements for a 21st-century workflow solution, it had several key considerations. The system needed to provide high performance to allow all the data to be downloaded from cameras within 24 hours of a launch. It needed to be able to scale to support future missions and higher resolution formats. It needed to store and retain multiple copies of files for protection and future use, and to give all users access to content as an automated part of the workflow.

Within the new NASA workflow the primary disk copy from the StorNext system is accessed by users directly while the files are active. As content ages and becomes inactive, it is removed from the disk, but an archive copy remains available in the archive for users to access. Files and metadata for them are visible through the IPV Curator media asset manager for all content, whether they are located on disk or in the archive.

www.ipv.com